December 2, 2014 by Steve Levine

Handling Testosterone Drug Injury Cases

A huge increase in television advertisements for “Low T” products in the last four years has now driven TV advertising for a new class of advertisers: Low T drug attorneys. Unlike the former, these new ads cropping up on male-centric television programing aren’t promoting the use of products like Androgel or Androderm, they are seeking victims to serve as plaintiffs in class action lawsuits against the makers of those products.

Marketing blitzes by the makers of these synthetic testosterone drugs drove demand for what was previously a very tiny medical segment, men who suffered from hypogonadism (clinically low testosterone levels), usually the result of injury or disease. After the industry began driving attention to their products through multi-million dollar advertising campaigns, prescriptions for these drugs surged exponentially. Critics claim that the these companies, in the quest for products, “created” a fairy-tale medical “condition ” of low testosterone, or Low T.  Testosterone products were promoted and (over) prescribed for nearly any ailment or complaint by male clients, even symptoms that would previously have been considered part of the natural aging process. Now, dozens of mass tort attorneys are gearing up to take on the industry, with new low-T lawsuits being filed every day. Numerous legal questionnaires are appearing online, collecting information from men who have alleged they were misled, and even physically harmed, by the makers of low-T products.

Increased Health Risks from Testosterone Products

The primary driver of testosterone drug cases is the increased rate of serious health effects in men after using them. Clinical studies and a recent FDA warning assert that the risk of cardiovascular side effects are doubled in low-T product users over the age of 65, and tripled in men over the age of 75. These men suffered from greatly increased rates of heart attack, stroke, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), even if they had no other risk factors prior to using testosterone products. If you are a victim of one of these cardiovascular events, or their attorney, the first priority should be to cease usage of the product if it hasn’t already been done, and then document what medical side effects occurred, and when they occurred after the prescription was given.

Misleading Advertising of Low-T Products

For men who were unaware of the health risks when they began taking these drugs, the marketing efforts of these drug companies to “create” a disease in order to sell the “cure” has created additional avenues for recovery from men who used testosterone products. Although not all men who have taken these drugs have experienced serious medical side effects, they have still been harmed by the manufacturers, some lawsuits allege. This harm stems from misleading marketing claims, over-prescribing, and failure to explain risks of drug usage by the companies manufacturing these drugs. Evidence has shown that less than 25% of the men who have been prescribed these drugs were ever actually tested for hypogonadism, the only medical condition the drugs ever received FDA approval for as a treatment. While these concerns may not be as serious as actual heart attacks or death, these men are still victims of the drug companies responsible for promoting their products as safe and convenient treatments for all types of maladies, and could be compensable in federal courts.

Low-T attorneys in nearly every state, including California, Washington, Minnesota, and Florida, are filing lawsuits as individual actions or as part of the MDL Androgel Litigation in Illinois. If you believe you have a claim for low-T drug injury, consult with a qualified attorney in your state to discuss legal options, case proceedings, and settlement negotiations.

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